Looking for Service Engineer Training Programs

Reviews of books, training programs, web sites, etc.

6 posts Page 1 of 1
Does anyone know where one can obtain the following Service training :

GE / Amersham HPLCs
Waters HPLCs
Applied Bio MS


Do the OEM offer these "Factory Training" to non-employees or can one only get this through third party training programs? Any info and pointers would be appreciated.
http://fseforum.com - Where Field Service Engineers meet and share
I think service is treated as a "profit center" by most major vendors. As such, they have a strong disincentive to train third party service people. Most of the independent service people I know started out as factory employees.
-- Tom Jupille
LC Resources / Separation Science Associates
tjupille@lcresources.com
+ 1 (925) 297-5374
Yes that what I have come across.
Thank you for the reply.
http://fseforum.com - Where Field Service Engineers meet and share
Many will teach PM procedures and basic troubleshooting. I know that Waters does because I've taken the courses and I found them to be most helpful, especially since they also give the tools needed to replace seals and install pistons. They'll teach you to diagnose and rebuild pumps and injectors, but they won't go into electronics or optics troubleshooting & repair.
http://the-ghetto-chromatographer.blogspot.com/
juddc wrote:
Many will teach PM procedures and basic troubleshooting. I know that Waters does because I've taken the courses and I found them to be most helpful, especially since they also give the tools needed to replace seals and install pistons. They'll teach you to diagnose and rebuild pumps and injectors, but they won't go into electronics or optics troubleshooting & repair.


Yes, I am aware of that and have that training. I need training in depth enough to not have to rely on the OEM service contracts.
Thank you for the reply though.
http://fseforum.com - Where Field Service Engineers meet and share
I would think that with a properly run and cared for instrument in an environment that's not overly harsh, that would be sufficient training to avoid reliance on service contracts. In my experience, problems with electronics and optics are relatively rare. I've had one power supply in a detector pop in the last 20 years and they're not tough to diagnose or replace. I've also seen one board go bad, the instrument was new, so the issue was covered under warrantee. I have had some issues with an old fluorecense detector but beyond that, if you know how to diagnose a system, replace wear parts in pumps and injectors, swap out lamps, rebuild flow cells, then requalify them, you should be 90% there and perhaps you can consider a lower cost service plan.
http://the-ghetto-chromatographer.blogspot.com/
6 posts Page 1 of 1

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