isopropyl ether disposal question

Discussions about sample preparation: extraction, cleanup, derivatization, etc.

4 posts Page 1 of 1
Anyone have suggestions on the proper way to dispose of an unopened bottle of isopropyl ether?
Its got a 2015 expiration date.
Throw it out the window? That's what my old PhD supervisor used to do back in her uni days.

Hopefully there's not a lot of peroxide in there, especially if the bottle has been sealed from air. As long as there's no visible crystals sitting at the bottom you should be okay... But if you're cautious, you could do the potassium iodide test to see if there's any peroxide present. If there is, gentle washing with sodium metabisulfite solution will reduce them away. Otherwise, just dispose of it in flammable waste.

https://www.sigmaaldrich.com/AU/en/tech ... -formation

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ie50654a005
The fastest peroxide formation results from an insertion of oxygen at an alpha hydrogen. Isopropyl ether doesn't have an available alpha hydrogen so peroxide formation should be much slower.
Peroxide test strips are a good investment if you handle ether wastes of any kind.
Steve Reimer wrote:
The fastest peroxide formation results from an insertion of oxygen at an alpha hydrogen. Isopropyl ether doesn't have an available alpha hydrogen so peroxide formation should be much slower.
Peroxide test strips are a good investment if you handle ether wastes of any kind.

It does have an alpha hydrogen, the alpha carbon is tertiary. I thought it should be slower too because of the steric bulk at that carbon, but apparently it's faster than diethyl ether because the tertiary carbocation that results from loss of that hydrogen is more stable than what you get when you lose the same alpha hydrogen from diethyl ether. May also get some resonance stabilisation from the ether oxygen.

I second the suggestion of peroxide test strips, I've never used them but would be much more convenient than mucking around with making up test solutions.
4 posts Page 1 of 1

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